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Earth System Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 3, issue 1
Earth Syst. Dynam., 3, 49-61, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-3-49-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Earth Syst. Dynam., 3, 49-61, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-3-49-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 22 May 2012

Research article | 22 May 2012

Comparison of physically- and economically-based CO2-equivalences for methane

O. Boucher O. Boucher
  • Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, CNRS – UMR8539, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France

Abstract. There is a controversy on the role methane (and other short-lived species) should play in climate mitigation policies, and there is no consensus on what an optimal methane CO2-equivalence should be. We revisit this question by discussing some aspects of physically-based (i.e. global- warming potential or GWP and global temperature change potential or GTP) and socio-economically-based climate metrics. To this effect we use a simplified global damage potential (GDP) that was introduced by earlier authors and investigate the uncertainties in the methane CO2-equivalence that arise from physical and socio-economic factors. The median value of the methane GDP comes out very close to the widely used methane 100-yr GWP because of various compensating effects. However, there is a large spread in possible methane CO2-equivalences from this metric (1–99% interval: 10.0–42.5; 5–95% interval: 12.5–38.0) that is essentially due to the choice in some socio-economic parameters (i.e. the damage cost function and the discount rate). The main factor differentiating the methane 100-yr GTP from the methane 100-yr GWP and the GDP is the fact that the former metric is an end-point metric, whereas the latter are cumulative metrics. There is some rationale for an increase in the methane CO2-equivalence in the future as global warming unfolds, as implied by a convex damage function in the case of the GDP metric. We also show that a methane CO2-equivalence based on a pulse emission is sufficient to inform multi-year climate policies and emissions reductions, as long as there is enough visibility on CO2 prices and CO2-equivalences for the stakeholders.

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