Journal cover Journal topic
Earth System Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.589 IF 4.589
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 3.696 IF 5-year
    3.696
  • CiteScore<br/> value: 3.94 CiteScore
    3.94
  • SNIP value: 0.995 SNIP 0.995
  • SJR value: 2.742 SJR 2.742
  • IPP value: 3.679 IPP 3.679
  • h5-index value: 21 h5-index 21
Earth Syst. Dynam., 7, 681-696, 2016
http://www.earth-syst-dynam.net/7/681/2016/
doi:10.5194/esd-7-681-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
23 Aug 2016
Hemispherically asymmetric volcanic forcing of tropical hydroclimate during the last millennium
Christopher M. Colose et al.
Download
Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC1: 'Review of Hemispherically asymmetric volcanic forcing of tropical hydroclimate and water isotopologue variability during the last millennium', Anonymous Referee #1, 03 Jun 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Response to Review #1- Chris Colose', Chris Colose, 12 Jul 2016 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'Review of Hemispherically asymmetric volcanic forcing of tropical hydroclimate and water isotopologue variability during the last millennium by C. M. Colose, A. N. Le Grande and M. Vuille', Anonymous Referee #2, 13 Jun 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Response to review #2', Chris Colose, 12 Jul 2016 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by Editor) (14 Jul 2016) by Prof. Daniel Kirk-Davidoff  
AR by Chris Colose on behalf of the Authors (24 Jul 2016)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (02 Aug 2016) by Prof. Daniel Kirk-Davidoff  
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
A band of intense rainfall exists near the equator known as the intertropical convergence zone, which can migrate in response to climate forcings. Here, we assess such migration in response to volcanic eruptions of varying spatial structure (Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, or an eruption fairly symmetric about the equator). We do this using model simulations of the last millennium and link results to energetic constraints and the imprint eruptions may leave behind in past records.
A band of intense rainfall exists near the equator known as the intertropical convergence zone,...
Share